Sunday, October 14, 2007

The oil law is proof that the invasion of Iraq had nothing to do with the wellbeing of Iraqis.

http://www.hindu.com/mag/2007/10/07/stories/2007100750040300.htm


Level Playing Field
Who's being invaded by whom?
MIKE MARQUSEE
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The oil law is proof that the invasion of Iraq had nothing to do with the wellbeing of Iraqis.
http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/20/1523250
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In his speech to the ruling Labour Party's annual conference — one of the set-pieces of the British political calendar — new prime minister Gordon Brown used the words "Britain" and "British" more than 80 times ( including the dubious soundbite "British jobs for British workers), while Iraq and Afghanistan each received no more than a single passing reference.

At least 112 journalists have been killed in Iraq (more than in the Vietnam war).
 
The single most shamefully under-reported reality of Iraq is the death toll — and our role in it. A recent report by the firm British Opinion Research says that 1.2 million Iraqis have been killed since the invasion of 2003. That extends and confirms the findings of a survey published last year in The Lancet, a widely respected medical journal, that estimated the dead at 6,55,000 — at least 30 per cent of them at the hands of occupying forces . T
 
What's behind this sclerosis of democracy, this continuing pursuit of draining, unpopular, apparently unwinnable wars? A significant clue can be found in the recent announcement from BAE, Britain's second largest corporation, that profits this year would double to more than £500 million, thanks largely to Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
If the new foreign-investor-friendly oil law — designed by and for multinationals, with the assistance of British and U.S. governments — is ensconced in Iraq, two giant British businesses, BP and Shell, are poised to join the massive plunder.

War for oil

As Alan Greenspan, the former chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve Board, observed in his recently published memoirs, "It is politically inconvenient to acknowledge what everyone knows: the Iraq war was largely about oil."
 

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