Saturday, April 15, 2006

Bahrain boat 'was not licensed' * / Now tooth for an eye if corneal transplant fails

* Bahrain boat 'was not licensed' *
A boat which capsized off Bahrain with the loss of at least 57 lives did not
have the right paperwork, officials say.
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/1/hi/world/middle_east/4868932.stm

---

Now tooth for an eye if corneal transplant fails
R. Sujatha
Sankara Nethralaya has so far done the procedure on nine patients

Patient's tooth used to fix lens
Recommended for chemical injuries

CHENNAI: Using a person's own tooth to help him see is a boon in cases the
conventional corneal transplant from a cadaver fails.
Cadaver corneal transplant is the usual procedure done on patients suffering
from chemical injury to the eye. But such injuries leave the eyes too dry
and the transplant effort fails.
For some time now, Sankara Nethralaya has been suggesting osteo-odonto
keratoprosthesis (OOKP) procedure for such cases.
The technique was developed by an Italian surgeon Benedetto Strampelli in
the 1960s but was abandoned because of poor results. It was revived by his
student, Gian Carlo Falcinelli, working for San Camillo Hospital in Rome.
Sometimes the damage to the cornea, along with the ocular surface and the
limbal stem cells (the cells in the junction of the cornea and the
conjunctiva), is so severe that stem cell transplant is not viable. The
damage occurs following chemical injuries to the eye or Stevens Johnson
Syndrome (a form of severe drug allergy). In such conditions, though the
cornea is damaged internal structures such as the optic nerves and the
retina are functional. The OOKP procedure is done in two stages: The
patient's canine tooth is removed and prepared to hold the cylinder (lens).
It is then placed in a pocket under the skin of the other eye. A three cm
mucous is removed from inside the cheek to cover the sclera of the injured
eye.

---

---
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 0615-3, 04/14/2006
Tested on: 4/15/2006 11:40:21 PM
avast! - copyright (c) 2000-2004 ALWIL Software.
http://www.avast.com

No comments:

s e a r c h

Custom Search

The Hindu - Breaking News

BBC News | News Front Page | World Edition

Blog Archive